Natalie Munroe hero and truth sayer.

Natalie Munroe, the American teacher suspened for telling the truth, is my new hero. Number one on my list.

Her comments may have referenced the American education system, but exactly the same thing is happening in Australia. I lay much of the reason for the lazy attitude and non performance of our students at the feet of their parents who refuse to let their children accept responsilibity for their own decisions and actions, or to suffer any consequences.

Teachers are also used as political cannon fodder by all levels of government, instead of governments investing real money in the education system, and parents admitting that they have neglected their parental role in the stupid idea that they need to “buy” their children’s love and need to be their friend rather than their parent.

Anyway, Natalie Munroe is my hero. Tell it like it is, Natalie.

[Thank you to Emjay and Snowy for the alert].

11 thoughts on “Natalie Munroe hero and truth sayer.

  1. I’m touched by your words and this teacher. I have under my eyes a young girl whose parents buy love and all their children’s love. She succeeds in her studies, but she has 25kg overweight ! … I learned that her parents had asked her to borrow for them ! … I’m horrified by parents who instrumentalize their children to the benifit of their fantasies of success, sometimes, in the case of this young girl, in spite of their real situation of deep indebtedness ! …
    We have their poor alf destroyed children in our university classes …
    Have a nice day.

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  2. Many will agree with you. The most damaging aspect is social; i.e. family breakdown which results in the State having to take on the role of family (parental role). In many cultural/ social groups, the “parents” are a missing generation and it is grand-parents trying to deal with adolescent children. The other “group” of which you speak, where Parents are trying to be “friends” of their children rather than role models where discipline exists, strikes me as more of a middle class phenomenon. While they will be a pain in school, the commercial world will act as a leveller. It will be interesting to see how Gen Y/Z reshapes society to suit them (perhaps because of labour shortages) as Baby Boomers are accused of reshaping current society (because of their numbers).

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  3. Wow. I read most of her two posts. Poor girl. 😥 Being attacked for her blogs! I can’t imagine someone pointing a finger at me for simply explaining my life and work. What exactly are they all mad about? For her saying that a few of her students are lazy? Honestly, they are. I was considered a “over achiever” for doing the work correctly in high school. I didn’t “over” achieve. I did what I needed to and what the teacher expected of me.
    This may be off topic but it reminds me of my art classes in high school. We had a great art teacher who expected quality work from his students (of course taking into account each of their abilities.) Most students took it because they thought it would be “easy.” Ha! They often complained about him because he “expected too much.” They wanted him to expect stick figures and doodles–not to expect them to actually learn.

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    • Daughter1 is a media teacher and she says the same thing – students take her classes expecting them to be easy and fun, when in fact the subject is quite intensive and needs a lot of extra own time to complete. Instead of asking the kids to step up to the task the teachers are expected to dumb it down.
      I find that if I set a standard and explain what I expect that msot students will achieve that or better. We set the bar too low too often and usually to placate parents.

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    • Are you serious? Never mind the fact that she mocked Special Ed kids by saying, “I don’t care if you lick windows, pee on yourself or take the special bus, you hang in there sunshine, you’re special.” and you people support this lady?

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  4. The administration in the district where I worked clearly did NOT care about the students — straight from horse’s arses BUT what shocked me were the parents who had nothing to do with their children, especially those who needed more. They never showed up at school, never enforced (strong word but I mean “made sure homework was done”) and NEVER took any responsibility when face to face at parent-teacher conferences.

    Between the admin and parents, I stopped teaching after 2 years.

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    • I would have given up in the fist half of last year except I was going to let it defeat me (and I needed the money). At least now I am not in the classroom all day, and I have some comfort in being in a private school, but even so, the parents are too quicker to blame teachers, and also to believe that their little darling always tells the truth and nothing but the truth.

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  5. Could not agree more. More educators need to make stand. The level of accountability has somehow shifted from students and parents to the teachers. Its a shame.

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    • I also feel that if parents taught their children to respect others, then things might be better for teachers too. A lack of respect, because the parents don’t always support the teachers and the actions that are needed, is making it impossible to have discipline in the class room. Lack of respect is interferring with learning.

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