Where the wild things swim

Overseas news reports are full of shark stories now that one white American male has been sadly taken by a shark off the coast of Western Australian. They are in raptures that they might be hunting down the “killer shark” in revenge.

Well, I am sure that in the whole Indian Ocean that they will, with absolute certainty, find the exact shark that took the poor man. Aren’t you? I mean the shark must be swimming around with a big target on its back just to make it easier to find.

It is not like we humans invaded its natural habitat, swimming up and down in front of it, communicating, look at me, look at me. Right?

We don’t usually hunt down the “killer shark” these days, as most people recognise that the shark is just doing what it does naturally. It feeds. If we are silly enough to take the risk of going into its hunting grounds then we can expect to be on the menu. The shark doesn’t know we are a superior species, with sense enough to stay out of its habitat.

Plus, it is making Americans look like hysterics again. No doubt the big show of hunting the shark is just to calm the nerves of all those tourists who want adventure, without actual adventure!

I am sorry for the victim, and his family and friends, but surely no one can blame the shark for being a prime example of survival of the fittest.

24 thoughts on “Where the wild things swim

  1. I grew up surfing inside the blood triangle (triangle space that covers north of San Francisco, South to Point Sur, and out to the Farallon Islands). It’s a breeding ground for seals, and the great whites know it. If you surf, you know that floating in the water meant you could become a rubber coated snack. Every time someone gets bit, there is a HUGE deal over “finding the killer”. Like you said, the shark wasn’t being mean; it was just hungry. If you swim around in a food bowl, expect to get nibbled on.
    As a side note, I was watching House Hunters International where a couple was looking for a house along the Gold Coast of Australia. They found a house that was amazing. It had its own boat dock on a water way, but when the realtor said there were Bull sharks in the estuary, you could almost hear the needle scratch across the record. Yeah, they didn’t buy it…..We have our share of the Great Whites, but you guys have those nasty ones that like brackish water fifty miles inland…eeep!

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    • They are rare in the canals, and to be honest, no one swims in the canals. Too filthy for a start! We have all the nasties, poisonous spiders and snakes, sharks and box jelly fish. I stay out of the water, so nothing in there worries me, and I can handle a spider, but the snakes worry me. Brown snakes and you are dead in minutes.

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  2. SIgh. It’s just another case of Amurricans are ‘oh, so important’, let’s make it a world crisis when one ‘Murrican gets gobbled up by a wild animal.
    I do feel sorry for the victim and family. But, isn’t that what makes swimming with sharks or climbing mountains, or skydiving so exciting? The chance that something might happen?

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  3. Well, it seems to me the guy was out there swimming in the shark’s ocean.
    It’s not like the Saturday Night Live skit with “Land Shark” knocking on his door.
    When you are doing something dangerous, you have to know something bad can happen.
    Hope they didn’t go randomly killing guilty-looking sharks.
    (I mean, how does a shark go around looking innocent anyway?)

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  4. As an American, I can attest that I didn’t hear about this until after the second Yank, the Texan, bit it. Hilariously, they showed video of the beach where the victim was swimming, and there was a big ol’ sign warning of shark-infested waters. “I knew the job was dangerous when I took it…”

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    • Board riders get taken because they go out in whatever conditions (water logged brains I think) but tourists are the worst. Especially the poor Japanese tourists, they get too excited and drown. Our surf is quite rough and you need to be a strong swimmer to really enjoy it. I am a resort pool girl all the way, not that surprising to you I suspect!

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  5. I only saw it on Yahoo News, nothing local.

    My theory isn’t really that it’s “NEWS” because an American was involved, but that the media will take any little yet sensational story they can to distract the masses from the real problems in the world.

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    • Yes, the sensationalism is key. Mainstream media LOVES a good tragedy. In the 30 years since Don Henley wrote the song, nothing has changed. “Get the widow on the set. We need dirty laundry.”

      A lot of it is the 24-hour news cycle. The need to be constantly pumping new information onto one’s news website.

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  6. I liked the goldfish but I’m going to be heretical here and suggest that humans have the right (for the want of a better word) to cull dangerous species where appropriate. In northern Australia we now have crocodiles invading back yards during flood events. They are a protected species and I am not alone in wondering why given their numbers. There is a point about these kinds of animals learning to fear us and keeping their distance. I don’t agree with with sharks being caught and just the fin removed for a delicacy, but having controllable numbers harvested commercially seems appropriate to me. As are shark nets and enclosures. I don’t swim recreationally, but many thousands of Australians do. If proto-humans hadn’t attempted to control threats from the many species who were better suited to ground dwelling (sabre-tooth tigers, ect come to mind), we wouldn’t be here. Wonder who the dominant species would have been then?

    PS Had a 1 foot brown snake in the garden yesterday. Had to get one of the cats away from it. Luckily it was too cool a day for the snake to be too aggressive. Cat of course, caught the thing. If the snake had been bigger and the day hotter – bye-bye cat. Happened already since we have lived here on acreage just outside Toowoomba.

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  7. Good point FD. You probably remember better than I the Queenslander who became famous for his shark-catching activities last century. (I’ve forgotten his name) I believe that he eventually changed his mind on the usefulness of killing “maneaters”.

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