casting my vote

 

Today we are voting for a new state government, in what all polls predict will be a landslide for a party led by someone that I think is an arrogant little upstart. Such is democracy.

Voting is compulsory in Australia, and individuals can be fined if they don’t have a valid reason such as illness for not voting. In my mind, if you don’t vote, then you have no right to complain!

15 thoughts on “casting my vote

  1. Turnout in the UK is appalling but nearly everyone has an opinion.
    We should be more like Chechnya: 104% turnout with 98% voting for the President …….. maybe not.

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    • We had a state leader about thirty years ago who would have done exactly that if he could have. Corruption finally brought him down but it took years. He thought we were all most ungrateful!

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  2. Today will be a demonstration of the 3 certainties in life – death, taxes and the “It’s time” factor in elections. The Queensland government will be swept aside because they have been there too long and the electorate has stopped listening to them. The proverbial “Drover’s Dog” could win for the Liberal National Party. And Campbell Newman won’t even have to sit and beg to get the vote. Ratty.

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    • I thought they would get more than 7 seats. Well I hoped. I heard some guy had a bet that would win him a million dollars if they got 7 seats so he must be getting pretty excited. Did you see Katter on channel 9 last night. He was so rude and ignorant.

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  3. In Australia you have to vote? That’s a huge reverse from the US, where some states are trying to keep people from voting. There’s been talk of requiring photo ID at the polling stations, providing proof you are a US citizen or you’re a legal resident of the area, etc., all in the name of preventing “voter fraud,” which is very rare here. They really should be encouraging citizens to vote now, since on average less than 30% of all people legally able to vote show up at the polls on election day. It hardly can be called a democracy if no one votes. 😦

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    • Yes we have to vote in all elections – local govt (council), state and federal (national). They now send us little notices a week before and we can take that in and it speeds up identification. I think it helps because we are a such a multicultural country it must be difficult to understand and spell some of the surnames!
      What I find difficult to tolerate is when people say as in the case of Obama “he’s not my president” and I always think, yes he is, you have the gift of a democracy, appreciate it.

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  4. I remember when I first heard of this.
    My very first tenants were two graduate students, one of them from Canberra.
    One day she was all anxious about running to the post office to get her absentee ballot in/
    I was thinking how very good a citizen she was, and then she explained about the fines.
    I wish we had that here.

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    • Yes, once or twice we have had holidays plans and have had to arrange a postal vote. Older people can get a postal vote also. Few people are fined really, but the possibility if there. I missed a council election once as bed bound late in pregnancy on doctor’s orders. They sent me a letter asking me why and I just replied I was ill and that was the end of it. We have to register to vote when we turn 18 and make sure we change our address details whenever we move, but we don’t register to vote along party lines.

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    • Sometimes I must admit that it is hard to find someone worthwhile to vote for, but it does make one think about issues and values. Some people donkey vote (just write 1, 2 ,3 down the ballot) just to have voted. We also have distribution of preferences, so the person with the most votes doesn’t always when the preferences are sorted out, so it is important to think about the people and issues.

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  5. Wow…. I had not heard anything about Australian State elections but there again, unless it concerns Obama or the Republican fodder then it won’t get a look in here.
    COMPULSORY to vote? Wow. Amazing. Has it always been the case?

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    • Yes, we have always had compulsory voting and were one of the first countries to give women the vote. However we denied the right to vote to our indigenous people until 1962! We have council elections, state elections and federal elections every three years. Our national/federal government is a two chamber government, but in Queensland we only have a one chamber house. All very Westminster due to our British heritage. We have a preference voting system not first past the post. So the person with the most votes doesn’t always win.

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    • I get a bit annoyed when people say “he/she is not my president/prime minister” when someone they voted for doesn’t win. Well, yes they are, because we live in a democracy and we all get to cast a vote. We are lucky in that, in reality, there is little difference between our two main political parties, one is left of centre and the other right of centre and neither all that extreme.

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